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20091101
20091130
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WJZ (CBS) 10
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
. it was made in the united states. >> reporter: traditionally, dry wall was made from the white mineral gypsum. in its four form, gypsum emits no gas or odor. bad dry wall, however, is darker. we wanted to compare american and chinese dry wall so we purchased random samples of new american-made dry wall in six u.s. cities and new chinese-made dry wall in china. we also collected samples of dry wall from five damaged homes in the u.s. and had everything sent to the university of florida to be tested by a team of researchers led by professor tim townsend, a scientist and leading expert on the effects of dry wall on the environment. his team spent five months running a multitude of tests on the samples we provided by. the results were revealing. >> it's not as black-and-white as saying the chinese dry wall is bad and all the dry wall is good. >> reporter: as expected, the contaminated chinese samples gave you off high levels of sulr gaza strips. surprisingly, all but one u.s. sample emitted sulfur gases as well. not as levels as high as the chinese product but unexpected. even more surprising...
it for the united states to judge it because i think the united states has an experience of dealing with the same partner in the past few years. so this is what it is. >> reporter: if it doesn't change, officials say the afghan people will cast the vote that really counts and side with the taliban. katie? >> couric: david martin reporting from the pentagon tonight, thank you. now, the united states went to war in afghanistan less than a month after the attacks of september 11, 2001. today, a relic of that terrible day returned to new york city: steel from the ruins of the twin towers now part of the u.s. navy's newest warship. national correspondent jim axelrod has that story. >> reporter: the brand new u.s.s. "new york" sailed into the city it honors today. the symbolism lost on none of the sailors or marines on board. >> i will never forget what that felt like standing on the flight deck coming up the hudson river passing by the statue of liberty paying honor at ground zero. >> reporter: at 684 feet long, costing more than a billion dollars, the ship was built in part with 7.5 tons of steel fro
for an investigation on the battlefield because now we're saying he is subject to criminal court in the united states. >> reporter: but the most emotional moment for holder came as he was leaving the hearing. 9/11 family members like alice hoagland who lost a son on united flight 93 pleaded with him not to bring the accused terrorist to the u.s. >> we are heartsick and weary of the delays and the machinations and i am afraid that the theatrics are going to take over at this point and i very much regret that. >> reporter: holder says if the government somehow loses the case, khalid sheikh mohammed and the others would not be free, they'd be held in military custody as enemy combatants, virtually the same sat us the they now have. katie? >> couric: bob orr, bob, thanks very much. now turning to the president's trip to asia. he played tourist bundling up for a visit to the great wall of china. he called it magical. from there it was on to the final stop, south korea. before they left beijing, chief white house correspondent chip reid talked one on one with the president about a number of issues, includi
a better way. >> reporter: across the united states, getting vaccinated against swine flu has meant the frustration of hours waiting on line. >> thank you for waiting. you're in. thank you. >> reporter: contrast that with this, the quiet calm of a british doctor's office where it's vaccination by invitation only. >> of course we have to get the highest priority patients done first. >> reporter: everyone here got a phone call from their doctor because they have an underlying medical condition. she is pregnant, he is diabetic. jane theophilus takes medication that depresses her immune system. why is getting this vaccine important to you? >> it wasn't. i was told to come. (laughs). >> reporter: the centralization of britain's national health service, the n.h.s., means every at-risk person can be identified. each n.h.s. medical practice got 500 doses of vaccine, a first wave, to vaccinate the most vulnerable first. dr. steve field is a british g.p. and a harvard professor. >> in the united states, i get the feeling often that it's about survival of the fittest. survival of those with mo
and the president's long answer took on the tone of a polite lecture. >> i have a lot of cit nix the united states who can say all kinds of things about me. i actually think that that makes our democracy stronger and it makes me a better leader because it forces me to hear opinions that i don't want to hear. >> reporter: the white house said the rebuke was aimed at china's leaders but if they were watching it on t.v., most chinese were not because the government allowed it to run on only one local channel in shanghai. in the rest of china, they aired a open opera. but there did appear to be a crack in the great firewall. a cbs news analysis shows mr. obama's comments were posted in full on government web sites available to more than 300 million chinese with access to the internet. if that's a moral victory for the president, he'll probably want to savor it, because otherwise this visit to china is expected to bring more disappointment than success. >> as you know, this is my first visit to china. >> reporter: the president says the top goal in coming here is to create jobs for americans by convinc
's rivers, more than 50,000 invasive species have taken root in the united states and experts say they could cause up to $150 billion in damage every year. >> we end up dealing with productivity losses, perhaps in some cases ecosystem losses. >> reporter: it's a side effect of global trade, species hitchhike on transoceanic cargo ships and produce crossing borders. another culprit: pet owners who decide their exotic friends are too much to handle. >> this one is dead. >> reporter: the u.s. lags behind other countries in regulating invasive species, so states and counties are doing what they can. >> please help keep napa county glassy wing sharpshooter free. just say "not in my backyard." >> reporter: in florida's backyard, the python season just ended. 15 licensed hunters caught 37 snakes. hardly a success. yet a consolation for hunters. they're free to sell the skin and the meat. at this market in boston, a pound of python goes for $35. >> you really want to be very careful when you're preparing it as it has a delicate nature. >> reporter: there may be more for the taking next year. scienti
. activia light. ♪ activiaaa! >> couric: in beijing today, president obama said china helped pull the united states out of the recession by importing u.s. products. celia hatton tells us there there's a whole new generation of chinese consumers ready to shop till they drop. >> reporter: sam's club is drumming up business in the southern chinese city of guangzhou. this store opening marks the 173rd in china for parent company wal-mart in just 13 years. enthusiasm for spending money here is pulling this u.s. company and many more through the global recession. it's american products day. the store's 10,000 customers are celebrating snapping up u.s. brands from vitamins to laundry detergent. clearly capitalism's aa hit in communist china. older generations still save half their paychecks, but that trend is reversing as a nation of young shopaholics is born. salaries for young urban chinese have almost tripled in less than a decade, from $858 to $2,300 a month. but people in their 20s and 30s save next to nothing. instead they're on a spending spree. the best indicator in the number of credit car
in denmark where he will commit to cutting harmful emissions in the united states by 17% over the next decade. then it's on to norway to receive the nobel peace prize. the white house also confirmed the president will present his new afghan strategy next tuesday in a prime time address. more now from chief white house correspondent chip reid. >> reporter: speaking to west point cadets and a prime time television audience, the president tuesday will try to convince a deeply skeptical american public that the eight-year war in afghanistan is still necessary, that americans will not be safe until al qaeda is destroyed in afghanistan and pakistan, and that it will take 30,000 or more troops to finish the job. the white house says he will outline not just how to get those troops in but how he hopes to get them out. >> first and foremost he will say that we will not be there forever, that this is not an open-ended commitment. >> reporter: gibbs vigorously denied predictions by some military experts that u.s. troops will be in afghanistan for eight or nine more years. he said the president will argu
to the united states. >> my son was murdered, inhumanely murdered by terrorists. >> reporter: judith reece, who cluchd a photo of her dead son, sailed the al qaeda suspects might cause more pain once they are moved to new york. >> they are going to be able to sit and gloat over what they've done. >> reporter: beyond the emotional worries are legal concerns about the case. the subjects were subjected to harsh interrogation techniques, for years held in secret prisons with now access to attorneys, and khalid sheikh mohammed's confession came after he was waterboarded 183 times in one month. still, cbs news legal analyst andrew cohen says the government can prevail. >> the fact that khalid sheikh mohammed is going to stand trial in federal government in new york means the government has extra evidence that doesn't rely upon his statements, that it feels it can win a case without this waterboarding information. >> reporter: and the justice department has a strong record this terror cases with an 88% conviction rate. the blind shake abdul rahman, and world trade center bomber ram zee youseff were co
than in the united states. most often, work isn't the reason for suicides, but in these cases, many of those who have committed suicide or who have attempted suicide at france telecom have directly blamed the company and management for creating working conditions that made their lives intolerable. the suicides and dozens of attempts are happening all over the french network. suicide notes tell similar stories, blaming constant pressure to resign, impossible goals, frequent forced relocations and chaotic reorganization. this woman jumped to her death from her fifth floor office window after she was told her job was changing yet again and that she was being assigned to another new boss. "i'd rather die," she wrote. a man stabbed himself in the stomach at work after his manager told him he no longer had the skills the company needed. >> ( translated ): you're in your own bubble. too bad. it's a bubble without oxygen. you understand? you just can't live anymore. >> reporter: the company's c.e.o., booed by employees after yet another suicide, and pressured by the french government to sto
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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